Category Archives: news

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Developing an Australian Biosciences Data Capability – October 2017 update

Category : news

Within five years we estimate there will be more than 30,000 Australian researchers (and somewhere around 200,000 students) in agriculture, environment and health, spread across multiple roles: bioinformaticians, researchers who use and rely on bioinformatics-driven techniques, and those (the majority) who are still lab-focussed, perhaps using online resources to interpret research findings. These groups will have a variety of data needs and a variety of skills, and they will increasingly be interacting with both local and global resources.

So, questions arise such as: What infrastructure and activity is needed now to support all to do world-class science? Within our Australian funding context (in particular, the NCRIS Roadmap), what should we prioritise to give us the greatest leverage to access international resources and collaborations? How might we anticipate the kind of transformative science envisaged in a more data-intense future?

At the EMBL-ABR All Hands meeting held in Melbourne late in 2016, key people working across data, infrastructure and bioinformatics discussed the future needs for biosciences data capability (digital data, digital tools (software), cloud technologies and compute infrastructure) with members of the existing EMBL-ABR International Scientific Advisory Group (ISAG). Bioplatforms Australia then provided funding to contract Rhys Francis (author, NCRIS eResearch investment/super science plans (2007-10) and the draft eResearch Framework (2013-15)) to work with me to establish a framework, a plan, a process. Our ideas have since been ‘road tested’ at a large workshop with Queensland-based research leaders held in Brisbane earlier this month and more workshops are being planned for other States. We are also gathering a National Reference Group of high profile domain-specific researchers to act as guides and advocates. This group is meeting online in October in preparation for discussions with government in Canberra in late November. Concurrently we are testing our proposals with our experts on the EMBL-ABR ISAG.

We want to keep everyone informed about this process and this will generally be through the EMBL-ABR communication channels. So please sign up for EMBL-ABR news at www.embl-abr.org.au to get all updates.

If you wish to contribute to these discussions, or know how your institution or research is being represented in this process, please email alonie@unimelb.edu.au.


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Best Practice Data Life Cycle Approaches for the Life Sciences, now on F1000Research

Category : data life cycle , news

Following our very successful data life cycle workshops held in Melbourne in October 2016, the feedback, findings and further reflections are now published online at bioRxiv: http://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2017/07/24/167619.

The paper has since been accepted for publication at F1000Research and open to peer review.

From the Abstract:

Throughout history, the life sciences have been revolutionised by technological advances; in our era this is manifested by advances in instrumentation for data generation, and consequently researchers now routinely handle large amounts of heterogeneous data in digital formats. The simultaneous transitions towards biology as a data science and towards a ‘life cycle’ view of research data pose new challenges. Researchers face a bewildering landscape of data management requirements, recommendations and regulations, without necessarily being able to access data management training or possessing a clear understanding of practical approaches that can assist in data management in their particular research domain. Here we provide an overview of best practice data life cycle approaches for researchers in the life sciences/bioinformatics space with a particular focus on ‘omics’ datasets and computer-based data processing and analysis. We discuss the different stages of the data life cycle and provide practical suggestions for useful tools and resources to improve data management practices.

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The paper was led by Pip Griffin and Vicky Schneider with a number of co-authors including our Key Area Coordinators Group and Activity Leads and workshop faculty (local and international) and participants.

Go here for further details about these workshops.


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EMBL-ABR 2016 Annual Report now online

Category : news

May 2017

A LETTER FROM THE DIRECTORATE

The 2016 EMBL-ABR Annual Report, documenting our key achievements in 2016, is now available ONLINE.

The past twelve months have seen the transformation of this bioinformatics initiative into a structured, networked enterprise. We have demonstrated a working model for maximising the resources and skills existing amongst our own life science community and for mobilising them to connect with international expertise and resources, to ensure our research remains world class.

Our small team at the Hub hosted at VLSCI (now Melbourne Bioinformatics), working with limited resources, has successfully communicated our shared vision and created the mechanisms for the community to come together on our shared objectives.

EMBL-ABR has rapidly garnered significant support and fostered collaborative relationships with the European Bioinformatics Institute, the European Union’s ELIXIR and the United States’ CyVerse and National Institute of Health’s BD2K initiatives, extending the Australian life science community’s national and international engagement activities.

Our thanks to Bioplatforms Australia and the University of Melbourne for their ongoing investment in EMBL-ABR and to all the other people from institutions both here and overseas who have willingly given their own time and energies to us to help us achieve so much to date. It is going to be through that good will that we will be able to demonstrate how investment in bioinformatics infrastructure can benefit Australian research and industry and thereby attract the necessary funding we need to realise our goals.

Finally, our thanks to the team at Melbourne Bioinformatics who rose to the challenge to incorporate these tasks into their already full-time jobs to support so much of the activity as documented in this Report.

We commend this Report to you, and thank you for your ongoing interest in, and support for, our work.

Yours sincerely

Assoc Prof Andrew Lonie, Director                       

Assoc Prof Vicky Schneider, Deputy Director, EMBL-ABR

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Hard copies are being sent out to key stakeholders, please contact Christina Hall if you would like to receive one.